English vs Castellano which is easier.

TheStrangerousTheStrangerous Posts: 1,858
edited November 2017 in Off Topic

NOTE: Castellano is another word for "Spanish Language" ;)

Asking this, cause lately I've been teaching me-self Spanish, as a hobby. I'm curious whether if I'd been taught Spanish first, I'd have trouble learning American language. :trollface:

No mono linguistic gringos allowed, don't want no "English is the "eziest" language" bias, cause really:

English vs Castellano which is easier. 8 votes

Inglés
37%
boerhaebgyoshiAlbinMatt 3 votes
Castellano
12%
Reddeadcap 1 vote
Both
25%
K1X455Lord_Coctus 2 votes
None
25%
CyberVonCyberusGatoCommodore 2 votes

RIP DB
Like TF2, buried under gambling addicts and whales, forgetting the core gameplay.

Comments

  • AlbinMattAlbinMatt Posts: 1,053
    Inglés

    English for me. It is significantly different from my native language, Indonesian, but it got a whole lot easier after you learn the prefix-root-suffix system. Plus it helps a lot with learning other languages like Germanic or Romance ones.

    Never touched Spanish, though I have poked at French. I'd imagine it's just a lite version of French with less of a headache on pronounciation.

    If you want something legitimately tough, try Hoffdeutsch. I made the mistake of learning German, thinking it was just an older version of Nederland. Nope.

  • GatoCommodoreGatoCommodore Posts: 3,845
    edited November 2017
    None

    none

    when you just caught your usual midnight stroller, even tho you dont know english, you should just duct tape the mouth. And when you start to do it it wont even say no. Instead, it will mimic moan in pleasure.

    核P-MODEL-白く巨大で
                                                                    
  • None

    It just really differs between individuals, the English we are taught at school here is probably kindergarten grade stuff for English speaking countries yet some the pupils in my class can just about read a simple sentence

  • WintergreenWintergreen Posts: 575
    edited November 2017

    If English and Spanish are equally different in structure and all that linguistic fun stuff, wouldn't it be just as hard for a native Spanish speaker to learn English as it would a native English speaker to learn Spanish? I don't know how else you could quantify this. They're fundamentally different and the few remaining similarities go back to when the Germanic and Roman people got a little freaky with one another. It all depends on what other languages one has experience with. If you were a native French or Portuguese speaker then it's safe to assume Spanish would be easier to learn than somethin' along the lines of English, German, or Swedish.

    Edit: Starting to wake up more and this topic is weighing on me more than it should. If I had to answer, I'd say it's easier for Spanish (or any other speaker for that matter) to learn English than the contrary due to the prevalence of English all over the world. There's no escaping the almighty English. But hey, at least they use the same alphabet. I still have problems trying to decipher Cyrillic text whenever my girlfriend teaches me anything in Russian/Ukrainian. Y'all have it easy, man. Cyrillic looks like what would happen if you sent a Chinese man to a planet with aliens and they attempted to communicate.

  • @AlbinMatt said:
    Never touched Spanish, though I have poked at French. I'd imagine it's just a lite version of French with less of a headache on pronounciation.

    OOh, I sure had French in high school, so true about the hard pronunciation. Though it does kinda mess up my casual Spanish learning.
    My history is unlucky, regarding foreign language option at schools... Didn't have English 'til 4th grade, it's always been that overrated German... I never liked it, no matter how much they forced me to learn it. Just because they're my county's neighbors, doesn't mean I have ot learn it. Hate that idiotic mentality...

    @Wintergreen said:
    If English and Spanish are equally different in structure and all that linguistic fun stuff, wouldn't it be just as hard for a native Spanish speaker to learn English as it would a native English speaker to learn Spanish? I don't know how else you could quantify this.

    I get a feeling, if your native is harder than foreign you learn, then the foreign will be easier. However if the foreign's harder, compared to yours native, then prepare to die!

    Thankfully my native, which is Polish, is hard as balls, you have genders/plurals and singulars/cases/time tenses for both verbs and nouns and some more convoluted declination. I cannot image how much torture it is for outsiders...

    Heck, my English helps me learn Spanish sentence structure, while Polish is helpful for different Spanish conjugations.

    RIP DB
    Like TF2, buried under gambling addicts and whales, forgetting the core gameplay.

  • DjiesseDjiesse mtl.qc.caPosts: 853Special Editor

    English grammar is much simpler if only for two things: no gender (hence no notion of gender agreement for articles and adjectives) and ridiculously simple verb conjugations. Spanish, like all Latin languages, has to deal with genders and full-blown verb conjugations where each person and each tense means a different way of writing the verb (not just adding "will", "did", "would", etc. in front of a fixed form).

    I'm a native French speaker and I'm learning Portuguese for work at the moment and it has given me quite the insight on how hard it can be to pick a Latin language... :/

  • @Djiesse said:
    English grammar is much simpler if only for two things: no gender (hence no notion of gender agreement for articles and adjectives) and ridiculously simple verb conjugations. Spanish, like all Latin languages, has to deal with genders and full-blown verb conjugations where each person and each tense means a different way of writing the verb (not just adding "will", "did", "would", etc. in front of a fixed form).

    I'm a native French speaker and I'm learning Portuguese for work at the moment and it has given me quite the insight on how hard it can be to pick a Latin language... :/

    Can't argue with that.
    I do know that the side thinking "English is Hard" have valid points like: Hard pronunciation (Example: Son and Sun, Pear and Spear) with so many silent letters and one word having multiple meanings... Understandable.
    First time I had English in class, I was shocked to hear someone pronounce "Tomato" in British way! Yeah, I learnt informal 'Murican English thanks to cartoons and video games beforehand.

    RIP DB
    Like TF2, buried under gambling addicts and whales, forgetting the core gameplay.

  • AlbinMattAlbinMatt Posts: 1,053
    edited November 2017
    Inglés

    @Wintergreen said:

    Cyrillic looks like what would happen if you sent a Chinese man to a planet with aliens and they attempted to communicate.

    Eh, Ni Hao bleepy bloopidy boop! Vodka segodnya?

    Scheiße, ich messed up el formate.

  • bgyoshibgyoshi Posts: 926
    Inglés

    @AlbinMatt said:
    Cyrillic looks like what would happen if you sent a Chinese man to a planet with aliens and they attempted to communicate.

    Eh, Ni Hao bleepy bloopidy boop! Vodka segodnya?

    Scheiße, ich messed up el formate.

    Твою мать сука

    It's easy once you get the sounds down :P

    English is easier by virtue of being a very Bob the Builder language. You can mix prefixes and roots and suffixes together to make words you wouldn't otherwise know, which helps.

    Conversationally.. I'll have to say spanish is easier. There's fewer words to say and the grammatical structure is a bit easier to grasp. There also isn't the issue of having one word mean 100 different things depending on the context. Buffalo buffalo buffalo and all that.

    But when you're writing PROPER english and PROPER spanish...

    Spanish blows english out of the water in difficulty.

    Proper spanish is hard @$!#, english can't even hope to compare.

  • NailNail Wpg, CanadaPosts: 3,460

    depends on which English you mean, proper English or murican
    Proper English has all sorts of rules that murican ignores, like spelling and grammer

    moop
  • bgyoshibgyoshi Posts: 926
    Inglés

    @Nail said:
    depends on which English you mean, proper English or murican
    Proper English has all sorts of rules that murican ignores, like spelling and grammer

    Doesn't matter which

    Neither compare to proper spanish

  • TheStrangerousTheStrangerous Posts: 1,858
    edited December 2017

    English can have 1 word with multiple meanings.
    Spanish however has the opposite problem...

    We have 2 to have verbs and 2 to be verbs...

    Tener/Haber and Estar/Ser

    Oh boy... trying how to feel the momentum of context will be tricky...

    The Spanish which I obviously wanna learn is Mexican. But the book on how to speak is in Castellano. Hey wait it's 2 nouns describing the same language...

    And speaking of English grammar. I don't recall ever using Future Perferct Continous. What is this archaic speech? Never EVER encountered it, at all... Guess the same applies to Spanish?

    RIP DB
    Like TF2, buried under gambling addicts and whales, forgetting the core gameplay.

  • Come to Kentucky or Tennessee. We'll teach you all about proper grammerisms.

  • bgyoshibgyoshi Posts: 926
    edited December 2017
    Inglés

    @TheStrangerous said:

    And speaking of English grammar. I don't recall ever using Future Perferct Continous. What is this archaic speech? Never EVER encountered it, at all... Guess the same applies to Spanish?

    Describing actions that will continue until a point in the future? In english this is anything using will have been -------ing

    "I will have been working for 3 years in November."
    "They will have been making this episode for 50 hours tomorrow at noon."

    Not to be confused with will have (past tense)

    "I will have known him for 3 years in November."
    "They will have made this episode in 50 hours tomorrow at noon."

    These are just future perfect tense.

  • AlbinMattAlbinMatt Posts: 1,053
    Inglés

    @bgyoshi said:

    @AlbinMatt said:
    Cyrillic looks like what would happen if you sent a Chinese man to a planet with aliens and they attempted to communicate.

    Eh, Ni Hao bleepy bloopidy boop! Vodka segodnya?

    Scheiße, ich messed up el formate.

    Твою мать сука

    It's easy once you get the sounds down :P

    English is easier by virtue of being a very Bob the Builder language. You can mix prefixes and roots and suffixes together to make words you wouldn't otherwise know, which helps.

    Conversationally.. I'll have to say spanish is easier. There's fewer words to say and the grammatical structure is a bit easier to grasp. There also isn't the issue of having one word mean 100 different things depending on the context. Buffalo buffalo buffalo and all that.

    But when you're writing PROPER english and PROPER spanish...

    Spanish blows english out of the water in difficulty.

    Proper spanish is hard @$!#, english can't even hope to compare.

    German was made into a meme by the internet, but when I got into it, damnit man. The spaghetti words from compounding plus the cases just hurts. Have you ever had to change a noun, verb, and adjective just because you wanted to say something in the past, or passive?

  • bgyoshibgyoshi Posts: 926
    edited December 2017
    Inglés

    @AlbinMatt said:

    Have you ever had to change a noun, verb, and adjective just because you wanted to say something in the past, or passive?

    Pretty much every language that isn't a romance language (roman-spoken language) uses noun declension depending on case. If you think german is rough about it, try an eastern european language like Russian, Ukrainian, or the particularly evil Finnish which has so many declensions they literally have not discovered all possible declensions of their nouns.

  • Another horrible thing: NO NEUTRALITY

    I don't know what to compare dialect to. Same game on different gaming platforms?

    RIP DB
    Like TF2, buried under gambling addicts and whales, forgetting the core gameplay.

  • AlbinMattAlbinMatt Posts: 1,053
    Inglés

    Oh yes, I once saw Finnish and had seizures about it, and Hungarian too.

    While we're on thw topic of bashing languages, has anyone learned Chinese? Of course not, because there is no such thing as a Chinese language. There's like four distinct languages in China, and they are almost unintelligible to each other.

    My grandmother from my mother speaks one language (think it's Ge', but I'm not sure what you would romanize that as), half my family from grandpa's side speak Mandarin, some old lady who's like grandpa's niece can only speak Ho Kian, and a good portion of my family members from my father's side speak Cantonese. Family reunions were never fun.

  • bgyoshibgyoshi Posts: 926
    Inglés

    Chinese languages are particularly hard too because their grammar construction is completely different than ours.

    It seems like that language is based on conveying concepts and feelings instead of articulate direct sentences. But I don't know, I don't speak any of them and haven't looked deeply into it.

Sign In or Register to comment.